Sunpine Stäng

SunPine on sustainability in Dagens Industri

On 3 July, people could read the following about SunPine in Dagens Industri (a business daily):

“We have much to be pleased about. We have a production facility at Haraholmen outside Piteå that is now fine-tuned and functioning efficiently. We recently negotiated a very sizeable investment that will yield an additional product for us – rosin – and we gained a new partner in the form of international chemicals company Lawter,” says Magnus Edin, CEO of SunPine.
SunPine in Piteå is a good example of Sweden’s ability to develop innovative green technology and create new jobs. The company was launched in 2006 and currently employs, directly and indirectly, almost 100 people. The production facility was built in record time and now produces approximately 100,000 m3 crude tall diesel per year. This equates to two per cent of Sweden’s annual consumption of diesel and yields a reduction in national carbon dioxide emissions of roughly 250,000 tons per year.
The benefits of tall diesel are self-evident. The raw material comes chiefly from Swedish forests and sustainable Swedish forestry. If you look at the entire cycle, greenhouse gas emissions from tall diesel are extremely low. Since tall diesel is made using by-products from the pulp industry, there is no competition with foodstuffs production either, as is the case with many other types of biofuels using rapeseed, sugar cane, corn or soya as raw materials. SunPine is a world leader in manufacturing second-generation biofuels.
In May, it was announced that SunPine and international chemicals company Lawter plan to expand the bio-refinery in Piteå to produce rosin. This agreement means Lawter will secure long-term access to an important renewable raw material as well as becoming a part-owner of SunPine.
“We are very pleased about the agreement with Lawter, which gives us another string to our bow and also provides 10 new jobs at our facility at Haraholmen in Piteå. The manufacture of a new product – rosin – is an additional benefit and will make us less dependent on various political decisions. Our aim has always been to develop products that use crude tall oil as a raw material. There are a variety of applications within the chemicals industry, the food industry, hygiene and beauty products where tall oil can be used. Investment in rosin production is therefore a hugely important step in our development,” says Magnus Edin, CEO of SunPine.
Once the new production facility is complete in the autumn of 2015, SunPine will have three different products in its range – crude tall diesel, used as an additive in diesel fuels; rosin, which is a raw material for manufacturing products such as printing inks and adhesives, and bio-oil, an energy raw material used in the paper industry.
SunPine’s owners – Sveaskog, Södra, Preem and Kiram – have invested around SEK 350 million in the bio-refinery in Piteå and are pleased with progress. New part-owner Lawter is investing a considerable sum in the facility for the production of rosin.
“Our plan is to achieve a high enough level of profitability in 2014 for the owners to see a return on capital invested. At the same time, it is essential to constantly optimise production of crude tall diesel. Increased use of tall diesel is good for the company and our employees and is also in the national interest, since our operations contribute to the goal of a fossil-free vehicle fleet by 2030. Tall diesel is by no means the only solution, but it’s one that’s already available and doesn’t require the automotive industry to develop new engines,” says Magnus Edin.
Green fuels are currently exempt from energy and carbon dioxide tax.
These tax benefits are crucial to SunPine’s business.
Earlier this year, the government withdrew a proposal forcing fuel companies to use 3.5 per cent second-generation biofuel in their fuels.
“We hope the government comes back with a more ambitious proposal based on actual climate effect and which rewards operators who want to add more than 3.5 per cent,” concludes Magnus Edin.
Sustainable future for SunPine
SunPine in Piteå basks in the sun. And this unflagging optimism is not solely due to the company’s proximity to the sunny tourist resort of Pite Havsbad – the Norrland Riviera. SunPine processes a renewable raw material that comes from the Swedish forestry industry and actively contributes to reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, thereby playing its part in sustainable development.
sunpine.se.dev “We have much to be pleased about. We have a production facility at Haraholmen outside Piteå that is now fine-tuned and functioning efficiently. We recently negotiated a very sizeable investment that will yield an additional product for us – rosin – and we gained a new partner in the form of international chemicals company Lawter,” says Magnus Edin, CEO of SunPine.
SunPine in Piteå is a good example of Sweden’s ability to develop innovative green technology and create new jobs. The company was launched in 2006 and currently employs, directly and indirectly, almost 100 people. The production facility was built in record time and now produces approximately 100,000 m3 crude tall diesel per year. This equates to two per cent of Sweden’s annual consumption of diesel and yields a reduction in national carbon dioxide emissions of roughly 250,000 tons per year.
The benefits of tall diesel are self-evident. The raw material comes chiefly from Swedish forests and sustainable Swedish forestry. If you look at the entire cycle, greenhouse gas emissions from tall diesel are extremely low. Since tall diesel is made using by-products from the pulp industry, there is no competition with foodstuffs production either, as is the case with many other types of biofuels using rapeseed, sugar cane, corn or soya as raw materials. SunPine is a world leader in manufacturing second-generation biofuels.
In May, it was announced that SunPine and international chemicals company Lawter plan to expand the bio-refinery in Piteå to produce rosin. This agreement means Lawter will secure long-term access to an important renewable raw material as well as becoming a part-owner of SunPine.
“We are very pleased about the agreement with Lawter, which gives us another string to our bow and also provides 10 new jobs at our facility at Haraholmen in Piteå. The manufacture of a new product – rosin – is an additional benefit and will make us less dependent on various political decisions. Our aim has always been to develop products that use crude tall oil as a raw material. There are a variety of applications within the chemicals industry, the food industry, hygiene and beauty products where tall oil can be used. Investment in rosin production is therefore a hugely important step in our development,” says Magnus Edin, CEO of SunPine.
Once the new production facility is complete in the autumn of 2015, SunPine will have three different products in its range – crude tall diesel, used as an additive in diesel fuels; rosin, which is a raw material for manufacturing products such as printing inks and adhesives, and bio-oil, an energy raw material used in the paper industry.
SunPine’s owners – Sveaskog, Södra, Preem and Kiram – have invested around SEK 350 million in the bio-refinery in Piteå and are pleased with progress. New part-owner Lawter is investing a considerable sum in the facility for the production of rosin.
“Our plan is to achieve a high enough level of profitability in 2014 for the owners to see a return on capital invested. At the same time, it is essential to constantly optimise production of crude tall diesel. Increased use of tall diesel is good for the company and our employees and is also in the national interest, since our operations contribute to the goal of a fossil-free vehicle fleet by 2030. Tall diesel is by no means the only solution, but it’s one that’s already available and doesn’t require the automotive industry to develop new engines,” says Magnus Edin.
Green fuels are currently exempt from energy and carbon dioxide tax.
These tax benefits are crucial to SunPine’s business.
Earlier this year, the government withdrew a proposal forcing fuel companies to use 3.5 per cent second-generation biofuel in their fuels.
“We hope the government comes back with a more ambitious proposal based on actual climate effect and which rewards operators who want to add more than 3.5 per cent,” concludes Magnus Edin.
Sustainable future for SunPine
SunPine in Piteå basks in the sun. And this unflagging optimism is not solely due to the company’s proximity to the sunny tourist resort of Pite Havsbad – the Norrland Riviera. SunPine processes a renewable raw material that comes from the Swedish forestry industry and actively contributes to reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, thereby playing its part in sustainable development.
sunpine.se.dev

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The Sunpine Advantages

For every tree that is cut down two new are planted. Sustainable forest management accounts for 70% of Sweden's landmass.

Not produced from food resources like other biofuels made from cereals, crops, sugar and oil crops.

Our production protects agricultural land and uses sustainable forest management.

Our technology recycle industrial waste from paper pulp factories.

Our technology is the worlds greenest. Reducing emissions by up to 90 %.